Marketing Products and Services Outside Your Local Market

Working in translations many of my clients work within the marketing industry and a large percentage of the work we undertake is to provide a localised version of a marketing communication campaign into specific languages. Typically this involves taking pre-existing copy for (usually) a pre-existing product or service and adapting it to fit the language of the desired non-native market. This can often be a complex process and there are many examples of companies that have gone through the localisation process of their products and services only to realise (often too late) that what they have produced is not suitable or, even worse, insulting to their intended market.

This article examines the various approaches organisations may adopt when looking to expand from their domestic market and also looks at localisation strategies they can use to aid in the success of their international marketing efforts. The main themes will focus more on the written word and the actual process of translating a marketing communication message, and does not take into consideration other issues that will affect the localisation process, such as the technological issue that may be present when developing a marketing strategy in a non-domestic market.

At this point it is worth what motivates organisations when promoting and selling their products and services into non-native markets. Typically, marketing products in markets outside the domestic domain fall into 4 categories. In the first approach, companies undertake what can be referred to as infrequent foreign marketing. Here companies will use foreign markets as a means to eliminate surpluses which an over saturated domestic market is unable to absorb. Here marketing activities may be very short term and may only require a minimal amount of translation and localisation. Alternatively, companies may believe that there is enough of a sustainable foreign market on an ongoing basis and will adopt regular foreign marketing activities. In this instance the domestic market is still the main focus, however, often by the use of middle men and agents, companies who use this approach are able to service both domestic and international markets simultaneously. The third approach is to focus on international marketing as part of a whole marketing strategy. Here international markets are seen as equally important as domestic markets. Companies will often perceive their markets to possess unique characteristics for which individual marketing strategies and characteristics will need to be adopted. The process involved in localisation and translation in this approach can be fairly complex, however, it will also allow for a closely targeted market, reaching segments that perhaps a more uniform approach may not reach.

The fourth approach is to view the world as a single market. Referred to as global marketing, this approach standardises its processes and activities to offer a common product or service through all the markets they serve.

It is worth considering which approach your organisation or, if you are working on behalf of someone else, your client is adopting. These different approaches will affect the overall process of how you implement your marketing strategy and will also involve varying amounts of resources. Although advances in technology have made the deployment of a targeted message more cost effective, individual translation will need to be processed by a human and therefore marketers and business managers will need to consider the potential ROI (return on investment) that an approach such international marketing will generate versus the resources needed to process this strategy.

Fundamental to the successful launch of a marketing campaign into a non-domestic market is a good understanding of the nature of that market. If, for example, your objective is to launch a specific product or brand into a new market, analysis should be undertaken into the suitability of the existing brand’s identity (e.g., colour, shape, text) in the existing market. What works well from a branding perspective in one market may be disastrous in another, and there are many examples of companies who have launched an international campaign based around a specific domestic campaign only to discover that the brand that is at the heart of the message carries an unsavoury name or connotation. At the very least we suggest a brand name analysis should be undertaken prior to launching a brand into a new market.

It’s also worth noting the other cultural convention of your proposed target market. Colour, for example, can play a key role in a company’s identity but this identity may have many different connotations depending on the target market. It is also crucial to understand how your market responds to messages. Some markets may respond very positively to a less formal approach when delivering a message, whereas more conservative markets may see this approach as sloppy or unprofessional.

A common approach in copy writing is to use analogies in an attempt to make the reader draw similarities with the product or service under discussion and an existing, perhaps well known product or service. Often these analogies will be based on an understanding of an entity that is known to the reader in the existing market, but may be unknown or alien in the new proposed target market. Examples are comparing physical size of somewhere to a geographically known location in the domestic e.g., “an area the size of Birmingham” etc.

Because of the subjective nature of translation, whenever undertaking any translation assignment it is vital to use a translator who is not only an expert linguist but also an expert in their respective field. Using a technical translator to localise a marketing brochure selling financial services just will not do. Translation of marketing material goes beyond the literal and involves the ability to interpret the essence of the message. Translators who are used to translate branding and corporate identity need to distil the message, taking the key elements and present it in a language that the target market will respond to. In this instance, using mother tongue translators based in the country of origin is vital.

In summary then we suggest that, as a minimum, prior to launching a marketing message into a unknown market, initial research is undertaken into the feasibility of using the core message (be it the brand or what ever is at the heart of the communication) within the market. It is likely that business leaders and managers will have already determined that there is a need for a particular product or service in a specific market and that their product or service can successfully fill that need. It is then the job of the marketer to communicate this product or service to the desired new market.

Marketing Products Online – 6 Ways To Increase Sales

1. Proper Basics

To successfully market products online, you need 2 things: a website (or blog) where you sell your products, and traffic (visitors). WARNING, your website or blog is something you will want to buy. It is not recommend to get a free one as the owners can delete or make changes to your site at any time. You need complete control over yourself and your product promotion, and owning your website is essential. For the web design or layout; see what other online marketers in your niche are doing to promote their products, and learn from them. The best design is popular design. Associate and link with people marketing the same products as you are online. That will create an image for yourself, which can eventually result in recommendations about you, and long term traffic for your promotions and products.

2. Promote Using Facebook and Twitter

This is great to let people know about you, your site, and/or what you are promoting. Provide links. There are easy and advanced strategies to set up your Facebook page and ‘like’ strategies to get lots of visitors from Facebook to your website. Twitter messages and Facebook combined can get the word out about the products you’re marketing online, and give you an initial burst of decent traffic.

3. Marketing Your Product Online Through Articles

Write short articles of around 450 words that target search-engine-friendly keywords related your product/niche where you give tips, advise, and helpful information within the niche – then directing the readers to your website through links in the article. Submit the articles to online article directories which already get traffic and rank high in the search engines. The more articles you have submitted on these article directories, the more traffic will your website get, and you will be more successful in marketing your products online.

4. Market Products Online Using YouTube

This strategy is really powerful. Although you can (and should) market yourself in the videos, you can create reviews on power-point presentations on future product launches of other marketers in your niche, record them, and post them on YouTube. At the end of the video you redirect them to your own website through the link at the bottom of the video. See thousands of visitors and buyers coming by simply marketing your products with this strategy.

5. Advertise Your Products Online

There are lots of misconceptions on how to properly market online using advertising, and most people do it incorrectly. However, it is very cheap and when done correctly; you can generate crazy amounts of sales.

6. Increase Sales By Learning From an Expert

If you want more sales through your marketing of products online, whether it’s your own or someone else’s product – you must learn from the best. Get an expert to walk you through the process, while watching his screen and following along, and make money as you progress.

Marketing Product Strategy – Fill the Biggest Need

It has been quoted that there are two things certain in this lifetime, death and taxes. Now, it would seem to me, if a savvy marketer was to create an effective marketing product strategy, she would want to market a product that people actually need. According to the first quote, there are really only two needs in this lifetime. Those two needs are air and money. No air results in death. No money results in evasion of our requirements.

Enjoy the free air. Air is not such a perfect marketing product strategy, because, even though it is a need, it is also in great supply. It wouldn’t even do us much good to market air to someone who lacks it. R.I.P. my needy customer of air. Sadly, we must let go of the idea of marketing air.

Everything but air can be bought with money. Yes, even love. Don’t believe me? Go visit your local pet store and ask for their unconditional animals’ love for free. Sorry, the door’s that way. It has even been noted that the hardest strain on a loving marriage is finances. Love may make the world go around, but it is money that pays for the ride. Money buys food, and it even buys water. The only thing it doesn’t buy is the thing we cannot market, because that is free.

So if we are to choose a marketing product strategy, doesn’t it make sense that we market something everyone needs? Doesn’t it make sense to market money? We could market the dollar bill, but honestly, what would be the point of that? Yes, there must be a marketing product of money that holds its value, even in the worst economy.

Doesn’t it make sense to market money that holds its value? Doesn’t it make sense to market something our DNA already knows? Doesn’t it make sense that our marketing product strategy focuses on gold and silver? Doesn’t it make sense that gold and silver be crafted in the form of collectible money?

If you are not directly marketing gold and silver money, graded, U.S. mint collectible money, my friend, do you think you should? Any other product is targeting a niche. Niches are market segments of people with specific needs. Have you ever heard of someone saying, “yeah, I just don’t need any more gold and silver coins.”

You see, your product may be excellent. It may be quality. Your product may solve a problem. Your product may even come in bulk. But the best marketing product strategy ought to focus on a unanimous need. Ideally, a marketing product strategy should focus on U.S. graded money, in the form of collectible gold and silver coins. Everybody needs it. Everybody wants it. Everybody requires it.

However, not everybody deserves it. Yes, I said deserves it. The feeling of deserve is actually created within. Sadly, not everyone feels they deserve it. You may have the best marketing product strategy. But until you feel you deserve to market the best product in the world, you will choose something else period. Isn’t it time you said enough is enough? Don’t you deserve to market the strongest product?